How We Think

COBRA: Providing Benefits and Beyond

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As an employer, you understand that healthcare coverage for employees and their families is essential to their wellbeing and the success of your organization. Because this coverage is essential, in 1986 the U.S. implemented the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). COBRA requires that private-sector employers, local, and state government agencies with group healthcare coverage, extend those benefits to cover employees and families who have faced termination, reduction of hours, divorce or the death of the employee. COBRA benefits allow the employee to maintain their healthcare coverage (medical, vision, and dental) for a period of time; this does not include…

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“OK Boomer”: Stopping Ageism Before it Starts

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“OK Boomer” memes and GIFs seem to be overtaking the internet. From Reddit to Facebook, the “Ok Boomer” craze has gained momentum as a way to dismiss commentary and fuel arguments among Millennials, Generation Z and the Baby Boomer generations. Initially contained to social media and online use, the phrase seemed harmless.  It gave individuals the ability to voice frustration and shut down arguments behind the anonymity of the internet.  But, as the phrase has grown in popularity, its use has extended into other social spheres, including the workplace. Today’s workforce is the most generationally diverse in American history. Employees…

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Difficult Feedback: How to Listen and Be Heard

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No matter how long you have worked as a supervisor, giving negative or difficult feedback is never easy. It can be challenging, stressful, and uncomfortable for you and your employees. While we are often tempted to shy away from the confrontations that can result from negative feedback, avoidance only results in frustration and stress for everyone involved. While there is no one way to provide feedback, approaching any feedback from a place of empathy and respect is the first step in ensuring difficult feedback goes down more easily. It is important to provide feedback in an environment that feels safe…

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Joint Employment: Understanding Liability

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Joint employment can be simply defined as the sharing of control or supervision of an employee by two organizations. While this seems relatively simple, joint employment can quickly become more complicated. In most instances, there is a primary employer and a secondary employer. The primary employer is responsible for hiring, scheduling, paying, and providing benefits for the employee. The secondary employer does not hire nor directly pay the employee but benefits from the employee’s services and often oversees a portion, if not all, of their work. Some examples of a joint employee are a temporary employee hired through a staffing…

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