Archive for February, 2019

Overcoming Unconscious Bias with Blind Hiring

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Unconscious bias is an issue that plagues organizations in every industry, unintentionally preventing diversity and keeping out the creativity that leads to organizational success. To avoid this, some companies are turning to blind hiring. Blind hiring offers a way to avoid unintentional bias, creating the opportunity to hire the most qualified staff, increase diversity, and bring in new and creative ideas. Blind hiring is the process of removing any and all identifying or classifying information from candidates’ applications. Studies show that employers often, sometimes unconsciously, favor applicants from specific backgrounds. In addition to being discriminatory, this can hurt diversity and…

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Employment Laws You Need to Know

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It’s important that leaders and managers are familiar with federal, state, and local employment law. After all, these laws inform your policy and procedure, and understanding of them keeps your organization compliant and employees happy. That said, memorizing every employment law is impossible and as the saying goes ‘you do not need to know everything, you just need to know where to find it.’ While every employment law is important, here are eight key laws you should hit when trying to broaden your knowledge of employment regulation. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 This federal law protects…

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Finding Meaning In Employee Recognition

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The goal of employee recognition is to reinforce positive behaviors, praise individual contributions, and create a more productive workplace. The regular use of employee recognition not only increases productivity but also trust, job satisfaction, and organizational loyalty. No matter how you approach employee recognition and rewards, it is essential to employee tenure and your organization’s success. A 2017 study of the American workforce found that only 1/3 of employees found meaning in their work, and of that third 93% reported regular recognition in their organization. The other 2/3 of American employees reported little to no recognition in their organization within…

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The Slow Death of the Five-Day Workweek

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Borne out of necessity, the five-day workweek was introduced in the early 20th century. In an age of new technology and increased awareness of workers’ rights, a limited workweek allowed employers to meet employee demands while ensuring organizational productivity. In 1926, Henry Ford adopted the five-day work-week for his company, creating a standard that the rest of the world would follow. Over the next decade the trend would spread across the United States and in 1938 this standard, along with the forty-hour work week, would become law. For employees, this allowed them control over the number of hours an employer…

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